Naturaly overcome and reverse Diabetes

Eliminating needles, insulin, and unnecessary amputations.

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You Can Reverse Diabetes in 6 to 12 Months.

About Diabetes

Diabetes is disease of the pancreas. The melanin centers of the pancreas (Islet of Langerhaus) are harmed or damaged. The condition exists when the body has sugar (natural fuel for the body) available, but fails to recognize it. This causes excess sugar to accumulate, which the body gets rid of by excess urination. The urine will become morbid and change in odor and color. Excessive urinating causes thirst, dehydration, weight loss, loss of appetite, and an overworked kidney and pancreas. The pancreas secretes the hormone insulin, which stimulates the use of sugar. Diseases, emotions and /or social stressors can over stimulate the pituitary and/or adrenals, which overtaxes the pancreas, resulting in diabetes. People can have misdiagnosed or sub clinical diabetes-related diseases of high blood pressure, hyperactivity, kidney failure, cataracts, nerve damage, glaucoma, infertility, mood swings, hair loss, bone loss, etc. Diabetes is usually caused by overeating and refined carbohydrates (bleached white flour, white rice, white grits, cooked white potatoes, and refined white sugar). Eating excessive amounts of animal flesh and cooked animal fats (fats and proteins change to sugar in the body) can cause diabetes.

Epidemic Among Africans

  • Approximately eleven percent of all African Americans have diabetes.
  • Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death in African Americans.
  • African Americans have more amputations from diabetes than all other cultures. African Americans with diabetes experience kidney failure about four times more often than diabetic white Americans.
  • In 2005, diabetes has been the leading cause of blindness among African Americans.
  • The death rate for African Americans with diabetes is 40% higher than other cultures.
  • 3.2 million African Americans age 20 years and older (or 13.3 percent) have diabetes, one-third of whom are undiagnosed.
  • On average, African Americans are 1.8 times more likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites of similar age.
  • In general, African Americans are more likely to develop complications, have more disability, and are more likely to die as a result of diabetes than whites.
  • Diabetes results in death for 20 percent more African American men and 40 percent more African American women than whites.

Diabetic retinopathy is 40 percent to 50 percent more common in African Americans than in white Americans. This may also be related to higher rates of high blood pressure in African Americans.

African Americans with diabetes experience kidney failure – also called end-stage renal disease (ESRD) –about four times more often than diabetic white Americans.

Among diabetic African Americans, 9.3 per 1,000 were hospitalized for amputation (removal) of body parts (i.e. toes, feet) in 1994, compared with 5.8 per 1,000 white diabetic patients. Diabetic neuropathy is the diabetes complication that can damage nerve tissue and lead to a need for amputation.

National Diabetes Education Program

“Diabetes is ravaging our community. We must spread the word about the many ways we can beat this devastating disease,” said Risco.

Dr. James R. Gavin, III, Chair of NDEP and President of Morehouse School of Medicine.

"Every minute of every day, another American develops Type 2 diabetes,” said Dr. Gavin at the news conference announcing the outreach effort. “Nearly three million African Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes and millions more are likely to develop the disease in the coming years, unless we get serious about prevention today."

Complications

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. Total health care and related costs for the treatment of diabetes runs about $132 billion annually.

WHAT IS THE LINK BETWEEN CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND DIABETES?

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, accounting for about 65 percent of all deaths.

People with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people without diabetes.

People with Type 2 diabetes have the same high risk for heart attack as people without diabetes who already have had a heart attack.

About 73 percent of people with diabetes also have high blood pressure.

Smoking doubles the risk for heart disease in people with diabetes.

Diabetes is a self-managed disease. People with diabetes must take responsibility for their day-to-day care.

For treatment and diet instructions order the Overcoming Diabetes Video or the book African Holistic Health. For diet order the "Crossover Diet Cookbook."

References:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, data from the National Health Interview Survey. U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1999 (CDC website).

Harris MI, Flegal KM, Cowie CC, et al. Prevalence of Diabetes, Impaired Fasting Glucose, and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in U.S. Adults: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-94. Diabetes Care Vol. 21, 1998.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Examination Statistics. Unpublished data, (http://www.cdc.gov/).

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, "Diabetes in African Americans," (http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/diabetes/pubs/afam/afam.htm).

Gu K, Cowie CC, Harris MI: Mortality in Adults With and Without Diabetes in a National Cohort of the US Population, 1971-93. Diabetes Care, vol. 21, 1998.

Harris MI, Klein R, Cowie CC, Rowland M, Byrd-Holt DD: Is the Risk of Diabetic Retinopathy Greater in Non-Hispanic African Americans and Mexican Americans Than in Non-Hispanic Whites With Type 2 Diabetes: A US Population Study. Diabetes Care, vol. 21, 1998.

Cowie CC, Port FK, Wolfe RA, Savage PJ, Moll PP, Hawthorne VM: Disparities In Incidence of Diabetic End-Stage Renal Disease By Race And Type of Diabetes. New England Journal of Medicine 321:1074-1079, 1989.

Geiss, LS (editor). Diabetes Surveillance, 1997. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, 1997.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, data from the National Health Interview Survey. U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1999 (http://www.cdc.gov/).

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, "Diabetes in African Americans," (http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health/diabetes/pubs/afam/afam.htm).

Geiss, LS (editor). Diabetes Surveillance, 1997. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, 1997

Stern, N. & Tuck, M. Pathogenesis of Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetes Mellitus, a Fundamental and Clinical Test. 2nd Edition, (Philadelphia; A.Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000) 943-957.

Keen, H., et al. Nutrient Intake, Adiposity, and Diabetes. British Medical Journal. 1989; 1:00 655_658

Cleave, T. and Campbell, G. (Bristol, England: Diabetes, Coronary Thrombosis and the Saccharine Disease: John Wright and Sons, 1960).

Reiser, S., et al. Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986; 43:151-159.

Kozlovsky, A., et al. Effects of Diets High in Simple Sugars on Urinary Chromium Losses. Metabolism. June 1986; 35:515-518.